Getting in Sync with Pratchett: The Wee Free Men…

The Bookshelf Gargoyle

the wee free men

Well, it has finally happened; that which I was despairing of ever occurring has come to pass: I have read a Terry Pratchett book all the way through and enjoyed it!  Hurrah!  I know I’ve said it before on this blog, but even though Terry Pratchett is the kind of author that I should automatically adore, given that I enjoy funny, subversive, slightly silly fantasy tales, I haven’t ever gelled with any of his books for some reason.  Finally though, it has happened.

We received this new release edition of The Wee Free Men by Terry Pratchett, being the thirtieth in the Discworld series and the first book in the Tiffany Aching five-book series, from the publisher via Netgalley and here’s the blurb from Goodreads:

Tiffany wants to be a witch when she grows up.

A proper one, with a pointy hat. And flying, she’s always dreamed of flying…

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My Review of Aster Wood and the Lost Maps of Almara

Review:

Aster Wood and the Lost Maps of Almara - J.B. Cantwell

Aster Wood and the Lost Maps of Almara by J.B. Cantwell is the first installment of the Aster Wood series. This story is about Aster Wood, who finds out that he is the one to find the sorcerer, Almara.

 

This story is full of magic and different worlds that Aster has to follow to find Almara. This story was good, but the flow of the story was interrupted by the editing. If the editing would have been better, then this would have been an easy 5 star read.

 

I want to add that this book is written by J.B. Cantwell, and not written by R.J. Cantwell. J.B. Cantwell and myself have alerted Booklikes of this mistake, but it has not been amended as of the writing of this review.

Original post:
FeeRoberts.booklikes.com/post/1560481/my-review-of-aster-wood-and-the-lost-maps-of-almara

My Review of Dragon’s Heir

Review:

Dragon's Heir - Kandi J. Wyatt

Dragon’s Heir by Kandi J. Wyatt is the second installment of the Dragon Courage series. Ten winters have went by since the first book. Rider Braidyn and his dragon, Turqueso, have made a home, so to speak, in the town of Boeskay. He finds out that two nestlings have been stolen and he vows to find out who is responsible.

 

This is one of my most favorite series. I absolutely adore the characters that I have come to know. Kandi’s ability to have family times included in her books is heartwarming. Her writing is smooth and flows wonderfully. This is a wonderful story for all ages.

Original post:
FeeRoberts.booklikes.com/post/1560476/my-review-of-dragon-s-heir

My Review of The Treemakers

Review:

The Treemakers (The Treemakers Trilogy Book 1) - Christina L. Rozelle

The Treemakers by Christina L. Rozelle is the first book of The Treemakers Trilogy. It’s about a 16 year old girl, Joy, who has to work making “trees” so everyone will have air to breath. Joy becomes restless and wants to flee the prison and the torment the Superiors have thrust upon all those who make the “trees.”

 

This is a very interesting concept. I have never read a book quite like this. The world building was fabulous and the characters were well fleshed out. The author spins a wonderful tale of a world so far gone that it is frightening. I can’t wait to read the second installment.

Original post:
FeeRoberts.booklikes.com/post/1560475/my-review-of-the-treemakers

My Review of Made to Kill

Review:

Made to Kill: A Novel (L.A. Trilogy) - Adam Christopher

Made to Kill by Adam Christopher is part of the Ray Electromatic Mysteries, but I am not certain what order the books follow. It’s about Ray Electromatic and his business of killer for hire in disguise of a private detective company.

 

I absolutely loved this book! It reminded me of the ’50s B rated sci-fi movies. This book brought back a lot of childhood memories of my mom and me watching B movies until all hours of the night.

 

This story has great characters and wonderful story telling. I can’t wait to read more of the Ray Electromatic Mysteries.

 

I won this copy in a giveaway and all opinions are my own.

Original post:
FeeRoberts.booklikes.com/post/1560473/my-review-of-made-to-kill

Gabbing About Graphic Novels: Giants, Trolls, Witches, Beasts…

The Bookshelf Gargoyle

gabbing-about-graphic-novels

If you are like me and find fairy tales and their retellings a mite tedious without some innovative new twist or format, then you will heartily appreciate Craig Phillips eye-poppingly viewable new collection, Giants, Trolls, Witches, Beasts: Ten Tales from the Deep Dark Wood.  This beautifully presented, large format book contains ten fairy and folk tales from around the world in graphic novel format.  We received our copy from Allen & Unwin for review and here’s the blurb from Goodreads:

Diverse myths and legends from around the world, from Iceland to Poland to Japan, retold in easy-to-read glorious full-colour comic book form by a stunning Australian artist with an international reputation.

A cobbler girl tricks the Wawel Dragon, after all the king’s knights fail…
The Polar Bear King loses his skin…
Momotaro, born from a peach, defies the ogres everyone else is too scared to face…
Snow White and…

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Bruce’s Shelfies: DNFs with Potential…

The Bookshelf Gargoyle

image

A while ago I decided to take on a DNF (Did not finish) default policy for all books that came across my path, inspired by this post by Anya at On Starships and Dragonwings blog.  As a result, I no longer push myself to finish books when my interest is waning or I’m just not feeling the story….

…but…

…that doesn’t necessarily mean that because I decide to DNF a book, it’s because the book is bad.  Sometimes I DNF because I can’t push through fast enough, or I started off enjoying the book but then lost interest.  So it is for today’s two titles.  Read on to find out why I made the decision to put them down…and why you might like to pick them up.


built on bones

I received Built on Bones:15000 Years of Urban Life and Death by Brenna Hassett from Bloomsbury Australia for review and here’s the blurb from

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